10th Annual Physical Cultural Studies Graduate Student Conference:

Redefining the Body in Physical Culture April 28th, 2017

PCS Poster

The Physical Cultural Studies (PCS) research program – housed within the Department of Kinesiology at the University of Maryland – is hosting their 10th Annual Graduate Student Conference on Friday April 28th, 2017 at the School of Public Health Building on the College Park campus. This one-day conference consists of a series of student presentations commenced with a keynote by Dr. Michael Friedman, PCS alumnus and current Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Kinesiology at UMD and a very special PCS address by Dr. Lucia Trimbur, Associate Professor of Sociology at John Jay College of Criminal Justice and the City University of New York graduate center.

This year, the conference is organized around the theme, “Redefining the Body in Physical Culture.” In the ten years since the conference’s inception at the University of Maryland, the project of Physical Cultural Studies has expanded its scope of research beyond the physical corpus. Increasingly, researchers have shifted their focus to the spaces/places that bodies inhabit, the impact of technologies on health and body, the effects of non-human agents in physical culture, as well as other topics that extend agency to non-humans. This work, as well as calls from within PCS to move beyond anthropocentrism, have led to questions of what the “physical” is in the critical study of physical culture.

Click here to download the PCS conference program (including abstracts).

Click here to download the PCS conference schedule of presentations.

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10th Annual Physical Cultural Studies Graduate Student Conference:

Roberts’ Research Appears in Preventive Medicine Reports

Dr. Jennifer Roberts had an article titled “Electronic media time and sedentary behaviors in children: Findings from the Built Environment and Active Play Study in the Washington DC area” published in Preventive Medicine Reports.

Click here for full access to the article: Full Article

Abstract

An objective of the Built Environment and Active Play (BEAP) Study was to examine whether home built environment, bedroom electronic presence, parental rules and demographics predicted children’s sedentary behavior (SB). In 2014, BEAP Study questionnaires were mailed to 2000 parents of children (7–12 years) within the Washington DC area. SB-Duration (hours/day) and SB-Frequency (days/week) were assessed by two questions with multiple subparts relating to SB activity type (e.g. car riding) and SB companionship (e.g. friends). Built environment, bedroom electronic presence, parental rules and demographic data were obtained through questionnaire items and ordered logistic regression models were used to examine whether these variables were associated with SB. Study sample included 144 children (female (50%); average age (9.7 years); White (56.3%); Black/African-American (23.7%); Asian-Americans (10.4%)). Nearly 40% of the sample reported daily solitary SB with car riding being the most frequently reported type of SB. Children living on streets without a dead-end/cul-de-sac exhibited a higher odds in SB-Duration using electric media [2.61 (CI: 1.31, 5.18)] and having no television in a child’s bedroom was associated with a lower odds in SB-Frequency [0.048 (CI: 0.006, 0.393)] and SB-Duration [0.085 (CI: 0.018, 0.395)]. Non-Hispanic/Latino children were also found to have higher odds in solitary SB-Frequency when parental rules of electronic use were modeled [8.56 (CI: 1.11, 66.01)]. Based on results from this cross-sectional study, home neighborhood built environment, bedroom electronic presence and absence of parental rules can significantly predict children’s SB.

Keywords

  • Sedentary behavior;
  • BEAP Study;
  • Built environment;
  • Electronic use;
  • Parental rules

 

 

Roberts’ Research Appears in Preventive Medicine Reports

Call for Abstracts: The 10th Annual Physical Cultural Studies Graduate Student Conference

“Redefining the Body in Physical Culture”

Friday,  April 28th, 2017

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Call for Abstracts

The Physical Cultural Studies Graduate Student Association – located within the Department of Kinesiology at the University of Maryland, College Park – will host their 10th Annual Graduate Student Conference on Friday, April 28th, 2017 at the School of Public Health Building. This one-day conference will consist of a series of student presentations as well as an expert panel to discuss the implications of the renovations of Cole Field House at the University of Maryland.

This year the conference is lucky enough to have two keynote presentations: an alumni keynote presentation by Dr. Michael Friedman, Physical Cultural Studies (PCS) alumnus and current Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Kinesiology at UMD and a very special PCS address by Dr. Lucia Trimbur, Associate Professor of Sociology at John Jay College of Criminal Justice and the City University of New York graduate center.

Continue reading “Call for Abstracts: The 10th Annual Physical Cultural Studies Graduate Student Conference”

Call for Abstracts: The 10th Annual Physical Cultural Studies Graduate Student Conference

Routledge Handbook of Physical Cultural Studies: Out Now!

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The handbook, featuring 58 chapters over 610 pages, written by leading figures within the field (including UMD PCSers present and past: Shannon Jette; Jake Bustad; Bryan Clift; Josh Newman; Ryan King-White; and, Michael Silk) has recently been published.

It is divided into nine parts (Groundings; Practices; Subjectified Bodies; Institutionalized Bodies; Experiential Bodies; Spaces; Contexts and Sites of Embodied Practice; Methodological Contingencies; Politics and Praxis).

The intention of the handbook is to contribute to the on-going formulation of the PCS project. As such, the various contributions to the handbook elucidate PCS as “a site of both internal and external struggle for precisely what it [PCS] should and could be now and, perhaps more importantly, in the future” (Silk, Andrews, & Thorpe, 2017, p. 2).

The handbook is available from Routledge here: Routledge Handbook of Physical Cultural Studies.

Routledge Handbook of Physical Cultural Studies: Out Now!

PCS’ Latest PhD!: Kristi Tredway

Congratulations to Dr. Kristi Tredway, the latest PCS student to graduate from the PhD program in the Department of Kinesiology, University of Maryland, College Park.

Tredway regalia

Kristi defended her dissertation–titled “Charging the Net: Social Activism in Women’s Professional Tennis–in April, and was officially hooded (by Dr. Shannon Jette) at the School of Public Health commencement ceremony on May 20.

Congratulations Kristi!!!!!

PCS’ Latest PhD!: Kristi Tredway

Batts Maddox to Miami, OH

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PCS alum Dr. Callie Batts Maddox has accepted a position as Assistant Professor in Cultural Studies of Sport at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. She will be working with the Sport Leadership and Management program within the Department of Kinesiology & Health. As part of her duties, Callie will teach undergraduate and graduate classes in social theories of sport and sport, power, and inequality. She will also contribute to the development of new course offerings and study abroad programs. Building on her interests in globalization and emerging sporting cultures, she plans to conduct research on baseball development in Uganda and the growth of global yoga tourism (amongst other things!). Joining Callie in Oxford will be her husband Charlie, daughter Beatrix, and their two street dogs from India, all of whom are excited to romp in the snow and eat Cincinnati chili.

Batts Maddox to Miami, OH

Rick to Springfield!

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Following a one year appointment, Oliver Rick (a 2014 graduate from the Physical Cultural Studies program at the University of Maryland) has been awarded a full time tenure track position with Springfield College at the rank of Assistant Professor. Oliver is now a faculty member in the Sport Management and Recreation Department within the School of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation.

Springfield College is a small teaching focused school in Western Massachusetts. The college is attended by a tight knit student body of only 3,000, however originally as the YMCA Training School and as the birthplace of basketball, it is a celebrated academic institution in the region. In particular it boasts a significant history in the study of sport, exercise, recreation, and health that informs a high level of research and scholarly innovation from current faculty members and graduate students.

Oliver looks to add to the Springfield tradition as he builds on an already impressive research and teaching record. Using Springfield as a base to expand his academic endeavors and explore exciting new spaces for the presentation of his work, Oliver continues with research projects that span across issues in sport, recreation, and active mobilities.

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Yes, for those of you old enough, the title of this news story was an attempt at an 80s joke.

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Rick to Springfield!